Ranking All 30 NFL Stadiums From Worst to Best

 A general view of CenturyLink Field before a game between the Seattle Seahawks and Minnesota Vikings in Seattle, Washington. Photo by Abbie Parr/Getty Images.

Some teams have better NFL stadiums than others.

Some stadiums—such as the Minnesota Vikings’ US Bank Stadium, the Atlanta Falcons’ Mercedes-Benz Stadium, the SoFi Stadium (shared by the Los Angeles Rams and Los Angeles Chargers), and the San Francisco 49ers (Levi’s Stadium)—are practically brand new and loaded with amenities. Others—like the Green Bay Packers’ Lambeau Field, the Kansas City Chiefs’ Arrowhead Stadium, and New Orleans Saints’ Mercedes-Benz Superdome—have been around for decades, and that history is part of what makes them special. When it comes to football betting, don’t you want to know which teams have the best home-field advantage?

But what makes a stadium great? What makes a stadium terrible? How do stadiums affect NFL odds? For each stadium, let’s look at their best feature, their worst feature, their home team(s), the year in which they were built, and their capacity. Let’s go from the worst NFL stadiums to the best NFL stadiums, with our NFL stadiums ranked from number 30 to number one.

The stadiums:

  • 30. FedEx Field, Washington Football Team
  • 29. MetLife Stadium, New York Jets/New York Giants
  • 28. TIAA Bank Field, Jacksonville Jaguars
  • 27. Paul Brown Stadium, Cincinnati Bengals
  • 26. Bank of America Stadium, Carolina Panthers
  • 25. FirstEnergy Stadium, Cleveland Browns
  • 24. Bills Stadium, Buffalo Bills
  • 23. Nissan Stadium, Tennessee Titans
  • 22. Raymond James Stadium, Tampa Bay Buccaneers
  • 21. Levi’s Stadium, San Francisco 49ers
  • 20. Soldier Field, Chicago Bears
  • 19. Ford Field, Detroit Lions
  • 18. Gillette Stadium, New England Patriots
  • 17. State Farm Stadium, Arizona Cardinals
  • 16. Hard Rock Stadium, Miami Dolphins
  • 15. M & T Bank Stadium, Baltimore Ravens
  • 14. NRG Stadium, Houston Texans
  • 13. Empower Field at Mile High, Denver Broncos
  • 12. Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia Eagles
  • 11. SoFi Stadium, Los Angeles Rams/Los Angeles Chargers
  • 10. Mercedes-Benz Superdome, New Orleans
  • 9. Heinz Field, Pittsburgh Steelers
  • 8. Allegiant Stadium, Las Vegas Raiders
  • 7. Lucas Oil Stadium, Indianapolis Colts
  • 6. US Bank Stadium, Minnesota Vikings
  • 5. Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Atlanta Falcons
  • 4. AT&T Stadium, Dallas Cowboys
  • 3. Arrowhead Stadium, Kansas City Chiefs
  • 2. CenturyLink Field, Seattle Seahawks
  • 1. Lambeau Field, Green Bay Packers

Let’s jump in!

30. FedEx Field, Washington Football Team

Aerial view of FedEXField in Landover, Maryland before agame between the New York Giants and Washington Football Team November 2020. Photo by Patrick McDermott/Getty Images.

Capacity: 79,000 

Year Opened: 1997 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Open

Best feature

Modern and relatively new, FedEx Field has seen numerous upgrades including improved video and concessions in recent years.

Worst feature

FedEx is hard to get to in Beltway traffic and lacks personality. That Washington rarely fields a competitive team doesn’t help either.

29. MetLife Stadium, New York Jets/New York Giants

Capacity: 82,500 

Year Opened: 2010 

Field: Turf 

Roof: Open

Best feature

MetLife is one of the newer stadiums and is located in the sports betting capital of New Jersey. It’s also an improvement on both the old Giants Stadium and the old Shea Stadium.

Worst feature

Not only does MetLife lack personality, but the on-field product is often atrocious, as neither team is competitive (nor have they been at any time in recent seasons).

28. TIAA Bank Field, Jacksonville Jaguars

Capacity: 67,814 

Year Opened: 1995 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Open

Best feature

If you have the money for the pricier tickets, the pool area is a special perk.

Worst feature

Despite having some of the cheaper tickets in the league, Jags’ games were regularly sparsely attended even pre-COVID, in part because the Jaguars frequently haven’t been very good.

27. Paul Brown Stadium, Cincinnati Bengals

Brandon Wilson #40 of the Cincinnati Bengals at Paul Brown Stadium November 2020. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images.

Capacity: 65,515 

Year Opened: 2000 

Field: Turf 

Roof: Open

Best feature

The location—downtown, and with great views of the Ohio River—is both convenient for fans and picturesque.

Worst feature

Paul Brown has been dubbed “an ode to concrete” by fans and lacks history or character. Just as bad, the Bengals have rarely been competitive in recent years; this year they still have great odds for the first pick in the draft yet again.

26. Bank of America Stadium, Carolina Panthers

Capacity: 75,419 

Year Opened: 1996 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Open

Best feature

The bronze Panther statues are a nice touch, and there isn’t a bad seat in the house.

Worst feature

Other than the bronze statues, Bank of America lacks those little touches that really help an NFL stadium feel like a team’s home.

25. FirstEnergy Stadium, Cleveland Browns

Capacity: 73,200 

Year Opened: 1999 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Open

Best feature

Even when the Browns aren’t very good (which has, unfortunately, been often), the Dawg Pound is one of the most rabid fan bases. Additionally, it’s built on the same land as the original stadium, home to NFL legends like Jim Brown and Otto Graham.

Worst feature

Other than bright orange seats, there isn’t much character to the stadium itself, and the wind off Lake Erie can be terrible.

24. Bills Stadium, Buffalo Bills

Aerial view of general view Bills Stadium in Orchard Park, New York. Photo by Bryan M. Bennett/Getty Images.

Capacity: 71,608 

Year Opened: 1973 

Field: Turf 

Roof: Open

Best feature

The tailgating is among the best in the NFL, and the fans are rowdy even when the Bills themselves aren’t very good, packing the seats even for the most frozen winter games. It’s also consistently one of the cheapest tickets in the league.

Worst feature

Though there have been periodic upgrades, Bills Stadium shows its age in lacking many modern stadium amenities.

23. Nissan Stadium, Tennessee Titans

Capacity: 75,419 

Year Opened: 1996 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Open

Best feature

The short walk from downtown Nashville is very fan-friendly, with access to lots of bars and restaurants, pre- and post-game, and the location on the east bank of the Cumberland River is scenic, too.

Worst feature

Concessions are expensive, and there aren’t nearly enough women’s restrooms. (There are more than twice as many men’s bathrooms.)

22. Raymond James Stadium, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Capacity: 65,890 

Year Opened: 1998 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Open

Best feature

The pirate ship and the cannons that go off after every Bucs score are both absolutely iconic.

Worst feature

Concessions and bathrooms are mediocre, but what really kills the fan experience is the lack of shade when temps regularly top 90 degrees for afternoon games.

21. Levi’s Stadium, San Francisco 49ers

Richie James #13 of the San Francisco 49ers runs for a touchdown against the Green Bay Packers at Levi's Stadium November 2020. Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images.

Capacity: 68,500 

Year Opened: 2015 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Open

Best feature

Tech features befitting Silicon Valley, including WiFi throughout the stadium and an app that can help you find your seats, order food and drink, and even find the shortest bathroom lines, are simply outstanding.

Worst feature

Levi’s is one of the most expensive venues, can be prohibitively hot (it lacks shade), and the location in Santa Clara is hardly fan-friendly.

20. Soldier Field, Chicago Bears

Capacity: 61,500 

Year Opened: 1924 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Open

Best feature

While the iconic Chicago skyline in the north end zone is a nice touch, where Soldier Field truly shines is the sheer history, which pre-dates even the first NFL playoffs by nearly a decade.

Worst feature

The wind that can whip off Lake Michigan can make late-season games miserable, though die-hard Bears fans would say that’s part of the charm. Parking and bathrooms are also both a problem.

19. Ford Field, Detroit Lions

Capacity: 65,000 

Year Opened: 2002 

Field: Turf 

Roof: Closed

Best feature

There are few, if any, bad seats and the dome can get quite rowdy when the Lions are playing well.

Worst feature

The Lions rarely play well and have yet to host a playoff game in the nearly two decades of Ford Field history.

18. Gillette Stadium, New England Patriots

Members of the New England Revolution and the D.C. United kneel on the pitch before match at Gillette Stadium November 2020. Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images.

Capacity: 66,829 

Year Opened: 2002 

Field: Turf 

Roof: Open

Best feature

The lighthouse is iconic, but the bridge in the north end zone is our favorite feature.

Worst feature

Were the Patriots less successful, Gillette would not be thought of as a good stadium: Traffic is usually terrible, parking is ugly, and concessions are barely adequate.

17. State Farm Stadium, Arizona Cardinals

Capacity: 63,400 

Year Opened: 2006 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Retractable

Best feature

The sightlines and acoustics are top-notch, but the crowning achievement has to be the innovative field tray, which allows the field to roll out for sun and water before going back under the retractable dome.

Worst feature

The location makes for long drive times, traffic jams, and ugly parking, not to mention the lack of downtown character that makes some other NFL stadiums so special.

16. Hard Rock Stadium, Miami Dolphins

Capacity: 65,326 

Year Opened: 1987 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Open

Best feature

Among the many recent improvements, the four new HD screens and the sunshade canopy are the best.

Worst feature

While this may change with a more competitive team and Tua Tagliova under center, Hard Rock has been overrun by visiting fans in recent years. 

15. M & T Bank Stadium, Baltimore Ravens

A general view of the Baltimore Ravens and Pittsburgh Steelers playing at M&T Bank Stadium November 2020. Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images.

Capacity: 71,008 

Year Opened: 1998 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Open

Best feature

Ravens’ fans are some of the most passionate in the league, and the stadium’s design puts them right on top of the field.

Worst feature

Parking can be a nightmare, and prices, in general, are among some of the steepest in the league.

14. NRG Stadium, Houston Texans

Capacity: 72,220 

Year Opened: 2002 

Field: Turf 

Roof: Retractable

Best feature

The retractable roof and location close to downtown restaurants are both top-notch.

Worst feature

The sightlines aren’t always great, parking can be a problem, and prices are high.

13. Empower Field at Mile High, Denver Broncos

Capacity: 76,125 

Year Opened: 2001

Field: Grass 

Roof: Open

Best feature

Honestly? The altitude. While the Broncos have been less competitive in recent seasons, there’s still plenty of evidence that other teams wear down as the game goes on.

Worst feature

Unlike previous mile-high stadiums, tailgating isn’t a huge part of Denver home games any longer—which is a definite bummer.

12. Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia Eagles

Carson Wentz #11 of the Philadelphia Eagles walks to the sidelines against the Dallas Cowboys at Lincoln Financial Field November, 2020. Photo by Mitchell Leff/Getty Images.

Capacity: 69,176 

Year Opened: 2003 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Open

Best feature

The amenities—especially compared to the old Eagles’ home, Veterans Stadium—are top-notch and family-friendly.

Worst feature

With those amenities, Eagles’ fans have lost some of their previous unruliness, making it a far more welcoming stadium for visiting teams and diminishing the home-field advantage.

11. SoFi Stadium, Los Angeles Rams/Los Angeles Chargers

Capacity: 70,240 

Year Opened: 2020 

Field: Turf 

Roof: Closed

Best feature

Given that it cost $5 billion, you can expect every amenity. There’s a reason the Super Bowl and Olympics are both planning to use SoFi.

Worst feature

Given that fans haven’t been allowed in yet, it’s hard to say for certain what the fan experience will be—but preliminary prices were quite steep and LA traffic is notoriously awful.

10. Mercedes-Benz Superdome, New Orleans Saints

Capacity: 73,000 

Year Opened: 1975 

Field: Turf 

Roof: Closed

Best feature

Few stadiums can match the volume and atmosphere when the Superdome is really rocking, much less everything that goes with being in downtown New Orleans.

Worst feature

While it has been regularly updated, the Superdome is showing signs of age and lacks a good tailgating area (unless you count the entire French Quarter, of course).

9. Heinz Field, Pittsburgh Steelers

The Pittsburgh Steelers take the field before the game against the Philadelphia Eagles at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images.

Capacity: 68,400 

Year Opened: 2001 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Open

Best feature

The Terrible Towel-waving crowd feels intimate (and intimidating), the Pittsburgh skyline is breathtaking, and the Heinz-inspired video display is, well, inspired. The location in Pittsburgh is fantastic, too, right on the North Shore.

Worst feature

Parking can be a struggle and prices tend to be on the higher side.

8. Allegiant Stadium, Las Vegas Raiders

Capacity: 65,000 

Year Opened: 2020 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Retractable

Best feature

Like State Farm Stadium in Arizona, Allegiant Stadium uses a roll-in field. Other touches include an 85-foot torch in honor of late Raiders owner Al Davis.

Worst feature

While the lack of fans so far makes it hard to know for sure, the location just off the strip and near the airport doesn’t seem particularly family-friendly.

7. Lucas Oil Stadium, Indianapolis Colts

Capacity: 67,000 

Year Opened: 2008 

Field: Turf 

Roof: Retractable

Best feature

In addition to the retractable roof, the large north window opens to a fantastic view of the Indianapolis skyline, and the downtown location is fantastic for fans.

Worst feature

The rules around when the roof can and cannot be open mean it is sometimes closed on gorgeous days.

6. US Bank Stadium, Minnesota Vikings

General view during the Minnesota Vikings game against the Detroit Lions at U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images

Capacity: 66,655 

Year Opened: 2016 

Field: Turf 

Roof: Closed

Best feature

The clear roof makes it look like an outdoor stadium on sunny days, and the fans’ seats are surprisingly close to the field. The downtown location is also great.

Worst feature

Parking and long bathroom lines have both been problems, and while the “Skol” chants are great when the Vikings are winning, there hasn’t been much to cheer this year.

5. Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Atlanta Falcons

Capacity: 71,250 

Year Opened: 2017 

Field: Turf 

Roof: Retractable

Best feature

“Fan-first” concession pricing has revolutionized the way other stadiums are approaching their concessions, and the pinwheel retractable roof is absolutely stunning.

Worst feature

Quite simply, the Falcons haven’t been very good since their epic collapse in Super Bowl LI, which has dampened the fan experience.

4. AT&T Stadium, Dallas Cowboys

Capacity: 80,000 

Year Opened: 2009 

Field: Turf 

Roof: Retractable

Best feature

The massive center-hung video board gets top billing, but the real treat is the sightlines; there’s not a bad seat to be found.

Worst feature

Sun glare has been a problem at times, but the bigger problem is that the Cowboys haven’t had much of a home-field advantage, going only 51-41 at home through the start of the 2020 season and regularly needing to use a silent count on account of visiting fans.

3. Arrowhead Stadium, Kansas City Chiefs

Tyreek Hill #10 of the Kansas City Chiefs scores a touchdown against the Carolina Panthers at Arrowhead Stadium. Photo by David Eulitt/Getty Images.

Capacity: 76,146 

Year Opened: 1972 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Open

Best feature

With apologies to Buffalo and Green Bay, Kansas City is the league’s best tailgating stadium—with so much barbecue that smoke sometimes rings the stadium. It’s also—at least for now—the loudest stadium in the league.

Worst feature

Of course, the location makes tailgating a necessity; there’s not much near Arrowhead Stadium.

2. CenturyLink Field, Seattle Seahawks

Capacity: 68,000 

Year Opened: 2002 

Field: Turf 

Roof: Open

Best feature

Until Kansas City stole the title back, the 12th man—Seattle’s token crazies—made Seattle the loudest place to play (and the design even intentionally amplifies noise), giving the Seahawks one of the biggest home-field advantages in the league.

Worst feature

Seahawks’ games can be expensive, with concession, parking, and ticket prices among the highest in the league.

1. Lambeau Field, Green Bay Packers

Game between the Green Bay Packers and the Minnesota Vikings at Lambeau Field. Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images.

Capacity: 81,435 

Year Opened: 1957 

Field: Grass 

Roof: Open

Best feature

Beer and brat tailgating, the neighborhood setting, the sheer history of Lambeau, and the frozen tundra—despite more than 60 years of use, Lambeau remains the standard against which other stadiums are judged.

Worst feature

Even the worst feature—the lower bowl bench seating—is a positive in frigid temps, all the better for allowing fans to stay cozy.

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